OK
12
12

Order Summary

3 Services

 1,234

View Cart
MORE
Store Timings
    search button image
    latest update icon
    DENTAL IMPLANTS@ Pashan Sus road A dental implant is an artificial tooth root that is placed into your jaw to hold a replacement tooth or bridge. Dental implants may be an option for people who have lost a tooth or teeth due to periodontal disease, an injury, or some other reason. TYPES OF DENTAL IMPLANTSEndosteal (in the bone): This is the most commonly used type of implant. The various types include screws, cylinders or blades surgically placed into the jawbone. Each implant holds one or more prosthetic teeth. This type of implant is generally used as an alternative for patients with bridges or removable dentures.Subperiosteal (on the bone): These are placed on top of the jaw with the metal framework's posts protruding through the gum to hold the prosthesis. These types of implants are used for patients who are unable to wear conventional dentures and who have minimal bone height. Before dental implant After dental implant ARE YOU A CANDIDATE FOR DENTAL IMPLANTS? The ideal candidate for a dental implant is in good general and oral health. Adequate bone in your jaw is needed to support the implant, and the best candidates have healthy gum tissues that are free of periodontal disease. Dental implants are intimately connected with the gum tissues and underlying bone in the mouth. Since periodontists are the dental experts who specialize in precisely these areas, they are ideal members of your dental implant team. Not only do periodontists have experience working with other dental professionals, they also have the special knowledge, training and facilities that you need to have teeth that look and feel just like your own. Your dentist and periodontist will work together to make your dreams come true. WHAT IS A DENTAL IMPLANT PROCEDURE LIKE? This procedure is a team effort between you, your dentist and your periodontist. Your periodontist and dentist will consult with you to determine where and how your implant should be placed. Depending on your specific condition and the type of implant chosen, your periodontist will create a treatment plan tailored to meet your needs. Replacing a Single Tooth   If you are missing a single tooth, one implant and a crown can replace it.Replacing Several Teeth   If you are missing several teeth, implant-supported bridges can replace them.Replacing All of Your Teeth   If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported full bridge or full denture can replace them.Sinus Augmentation   A key to implant success is the quantity and quality of the bone where the implant is to be placed. The upper back jaw has traditionally been one of the most difficult areas to successfully place dental implants due to insufficient bone quantity and quality and the close proximity to the sinus. Sinus augmentation can help correct this problem by raising the sinus floor and developing bone for the placement of dental implants.Ridge Modification   Deformities in the upper or lower jaw can leave you with inadequate bone in which to place dental implants. To correct the problem, the gum is lifted away from the ridge to expose the bony defect. The defect is then filled with bone or bone substitute to build up the ridge. Ridge modification has been shown to greatly improve appearance and increase your chances for successful implants that can last for years to come. WHAT CAN I EXPECT AFTER RECEIVING A DENTAL IMPLANT? As you know, your own teeth require conscientious at-home oral care and regular dental visits. Dental implants are like your own teeth and will require the same care. In order to keep your implant clean and plaque-free, brushing and flossing still apply! After treatment, your periodontist will work closely with you and your dentist to develop the best care plan for you. Periodic follow-up visits will be scheduled to monitor your implant, teeth and gums to make sure they are healthy.
    Read More
    Details
    Query
    Share
    `
    SEND
    latest update icon
    Dentures are replacements for missing teeth that can be taken out and put back into your mouth. While dentures take some getting used to, and will never feel exactly the same as one's natural teeth, today's dentures are natural looking and more comfortable than ever. There are two main types of dentures: full and partial. Your dentist will help you choose the type of denture that's best for you based on whether some or all of your teeth are going to be replaced and the cost involved. How do Dentures Work? With full dentures, a flesh-colored acrylic base fits over your gums. The base of the upper denture covers the palate (the roof of your mouth), while that of the lower denture is shaped like a horseshoe to accommodate your tongue. Dentures are custom-made in a dental laboratory from impressions taken of your mouth. Your dentist will determine which of the three types of dentures described below is best for you. Conventional Full Denture A conventional full denture is placed in your mouth after any remaining teeth are removed and tissues have healed. Healing may take several months, during which time you are without teeth. Immediate Full Denture An immediate full denture is inserted immediately after the remaining teeth are removed. (Your dentist takes measurements and makes models of your jaw during a prior visit.) While immediate dentures offer the benefit of never having to be without your teeth, they must be relined several months after being inserted. The reason is that the bone supporting the teeth reshapes as it heals, causing the denture to become loose. Partial Denture A partial denture rests on a metal framework that attaches to your natural teeth. Sometimes crowns are placed on some of your natural teeth and serve as anchors for the denture. Partial dentures offer a removable alternative to bridges. How Long Before I Get Used to My Dentures? New dentures may feel awkward or uncomfortable for the first few weeks or even months. Eating and speaking with dentures might take a little practice. A bulky or loose feeling is not uncommon, while the muscles of your cheeks and tongue learn to hold your dentures in place. Excessive saliva flow, a feeling that the tongue does not have adequate room, and minor irritation or soreness are also not unusual. If you experience irritation, see your dentist. How Long do Dentures Last? Over a period of time, your denture will need to be relined, remade, or rebased due to normal wear. Rebasing means making a new base while keeping the existing denture teeth. Also, as you age, your mouth naturally changes. These changes cause your dentures to loosen, making chewing difficult and irritating your gums. At a minimum, you should see your dentist annually for a checkup. Here are tips for caring for your dentures: When handling your dentures, stand over a folded towel or basin of water. Dentures are delicate and may break if dropped. Don't let your dentures dry out. Place them in a denture cleanser soaking solution or in plain water when you're not wearing them. Never use hot water, which can cause them to warp. Brushing your dentures daily will remove food deposits and plaque, and help prevent them from becoming stained. An ultrasonic cleaner may be used to care for your dentures, but it does not replace a thorough daily brushing. Brush your gums, tongue and palate every morning with a soft-bristled brush before you insert your dentures. This stimulates circulation in your tissues and helps remove plaque. See your dentist if your dentures break, chip, crack or become loose. Don't be tempted to adjust them yourself — this can damage them beyond repair.
    Read More
    Details
    Query
    Share
    `
    SEND
    latest update icon
    Complete Gum care in Pashan Sus Road @ dr mane's advanced dental clinic What is Gum Disease? Gum disease, or periodontisis, is a periodontal disease that starts with bacterial growth within the mouth and can end up destroying the tissue, leading to loose teeth and eventually tooth loss if not correctly treated. What are the causes of Gum Disease? To begin, the bacteria contained within plaque build-up causes the gums to become inflamed and sensitive. It’s at this point where it’s common that the gums will bleed during tooth brushing. This is one of the earliest signs of gum disease. At this point there is no permanent damage done but if left untreated, it can advance to periodontisis. During this stage, the inner layer of the gums pulls back from the teeth and exposes gaps which can fill with debris and become infected. The body’s natural immune response battles these infections and causes the degradation of the bone and tissue that anchors the teeth in place. Eventually this leads to loose teeth and tooth loss. Gum disease causes include: Poor oral hygiene habits Illness (such as cancer, HIV or diabetes) Smoking Genetics Medication Hormonal changes due to menstruation, pregnancy or the menopause Gum Disease Symptoms Some of the symptoms of gum disease include: Bleeding gums Tender, red or swollen gums Ongoing bad breath or foul taste in the mouth Deep pockets between the teeth Loose teeth As with all dental problems, it’s vital not to ignore the early signs of gum disease. Your dentist will be able to identify the symptoms of gum disease and propose an effective treatment. Gum Disease Treatment The treatment of gum disease is focused on encouraging the teeth to reattach to the gums, to reduce the size of the gaps between teeth, the swelling, the risk of infection and to prevent the condition from spreading.Specific treatments for gum disease can range from cleaning by a hygienist to scaling and root planing to remove plaque and tartar from both above and below the gum line. This removes all the bacteria and provides a clean surface for the gums to reattach to. Advance signs of gum disease may require surgical treatment that can include flap surgery (a more in depth version of planing and scaling) to bone and soft tissue grafts to encourage bone and tissue regrowth, respectively, and guided tissue or bone regeneration. This is often required when the loose tooth is at risk of falling out. Finally, antibiotics can be used to treat gum disease as well. How to prevent Gum Disease The best way to prevent gum disease is to follow a good oral hygiene routine that includes brushing and flossing at least twice a day. Antimicrobial toothpaste alongside a suitable mouthwash will also help to remove any bacteria that may be present. Regular visits to your hygienist as part of your dental check-up are also an important part of preventing gum disease.
    Read More
    Details
    Query
    Share
    `
    SEND
    Next >
    company logo